Trail Blazer Study – Families’ Experiences Living with Acquired Brain Injury

The Stroke Recovery Association of Manitoba is pleased to
work together with the University of Manitoba
advancing knowledge and understanding of the brain injury recovery process.

Click on the following YouTube link for a full description of the research study and invitation by Ms Jane Karpa, Doctoral student, to participate.

Link to YouTube: Families Living with Acquired Brain Injury

If you have any questions and/or would like additional information contact Jane Karpa by;

Email umkarpaj [at] myumanitoba [dot] ca or

Phone 204-896-0456

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How Technology Kick-Starts Stroke Recovery

A very enlightening article regarding the role of technology in stroke recovery.

This new stroke recovery technology is helping link neuroplasticity and learning – A key part in recovery from a stroke.

This new stroke technology gives patients more repetitions, practice time and intensity compared to previous movement trainings. Not to mention this new techno logy is also more interactive, attention grabbing and really helps motivate the patient. These new technologies are really helping harness the brain’s ability to repair itself in ways that haven’t been seen before.

Just like the simple exercises that caregivers have used for years, the latest stroke recovery tools revolve around the concept of neuroplasticity. https://www.saebo.com/technology-changing-stroke-rehabilitation/

New Peer Support Group at SAM

By: Janine LeGal Posted: 09/5/2017

New Support Group for Stroke Survivors

 The Stroke Recovery Association of Manitoba (SRAM) exists to remind stroke survivors that they are not alone, that there is life after a stroke and a place for rehabilitation, support, and friendship with others who understand.

Twenty years ago, in her 40s and with a young family, Anne Manitowich discovered the value and importance of SRAM, up close and personal, when she suffered first one stroke, and then another two years later.

The devastating experience affected her vision, focus, reaction time, balance and short-term memory. As a result, Manitowich can no longer drive or work. But she’s focused on what she can do. Having since become a member of the Stroke Recovery Association of Manitoba based in St. Boniface, Manitowich is now actively involved in being there for other stroke survivors by volunteering her time facilitating peer support groups.

On Sept. 19 from 1 to 3 pm at 247 Provencher Blvd., a new peer support group will begin for people recovering from a stroke. 

The support group will run the third Tuesday of every month. Knowing there are services and resources for stroke recovery can be the difference between isolation and thriving. Winnipeg Free Press New Peer Stroke Recovery Group

How Does a Non-Profit Registered Charity Come Into Being?

How Does a Non-Profit Registered Charity Come Into Being?

In 1969…..Right There When It Happened

Annette Saltel* was right there when it happened. In fact, she was instrumental in the establishment of Stroke Recovery.

It all started in 1969 when she survived a stroke. Diagnosis, being what it was back then, found Annette confined to the St. Boniface Hospital psychiatric ward for three weeks.

When further diagnoses were complete, she was admitted into the Health Sciences Centre (HSC) while she underwent three months of speech therapy. She was the only female in the program.

During her stay at HSC, she met someone who would play a major part in her life: George Bonnett, another stroke survivor. Their common dilemma brought them together and they became fast friends.

And, as fate would have it, George’s roommate at HSC was Walter Karlicki.

A Stroke Club, If You Will

Annette, who was soon to be released from the hospital, suggested to Walter and George that it would be a heck of an idea if there was somewhere where stroke survivors could meet, share their experiences and help one another.

A Stroke Club, if you will…with peer support groups. And at this point in time, stroke was still widely misunderstood…even by doctors.

No one knew what to do with a stroke survivor, and as such, many of them ended up in psychiatric wards as Annette did. The three decided to team up and create a group of people who fully understood what a stroke survivor experiences.

They began to meet at George’s home, but before long, the club outgrew his basement. In 1973 they moved to the downtown YMCA, the same year the Stroke Club of Manitoba was incorporated.

The Founding Members were Annette Saltel, a housekeeper who became the first Secretary, Walter Karlicki, a law clerk who became the first President, George Bonnett, a salesman who became the first Vice President, and Willie Pohl, a manager who became the first Treasurer.

Another early member was a woman by the name of Mary Ann St. Germaine, who didn’t stay long, but in her brief stay with the Stroke Club, made a contribution that would change the face of the organization forever…a doodle. She was doodling on a piece of paper one day and, out of the blue, drew a little walking man who resembled a half paralyzed stroke survivor.

At the time the little guy was nameless, but not for long.

Meet SAM

The Manitoba Stroke Club worked out of the YMCA until 1984, when more growth forced it to move to Lombard Ave. In March of 1986, the club changed its name to the Stroke Association of Manitoba and the little walking guy finally had a name. SAM.

Then Recovery

Then in 1995, ‘Recovery’, arguably the most important word in the organization’s name, was added in order to clarify and emphasize the mission and objective of the corporation.

The name change took place on April 8, 1995 and since then we have been known as the Stroke Recovery Association of Manitoba. In 1992, SAM once again outgrew its home and moved to Vaughan Street.

And Now We Are Here

Then, time and more growth have forced SAM to its newest and most picturesque location at 247 Provencher Boulevard, in the heart of the historic French Quarter in St. Boniface, and still we are growing at a rapid rate with more programs than ever before and space is at a premium.

We’ve come a long way since 1969, and throughout the years, we have been blessed with many incredible leaders…some, sadly taken from us…but remembered always.

*The source of this material is from Annette Saltel – SAM co-founder.