Speaking is Easy, join us every Friday from 11:00 am to 12:00 noon and discover how.

Did you know some of the most famous people experience difficulty speaking in public.

Speaking is Easy, join us every Friday from 11:00 am to 12:00 noon and discover why.

Winston Churchill, “We Shall Fight on the Beaches”
June 4, 1940; House of Commons, London

Winston Churchill, one of the greatest orators of the 20th century, was interestingly enough, like Demosthenes and other great orators before him, born with a speech impediment which he worked on until it no longer hindered him. One would never guess this from hearing Churchill’s strong and reassuring voice, a voice that would buoy up Britain during some of her darkest hours.

During the Battle of France, Allied Forces became cut off from troops south of the German penetration and perilously trapped at the Dunkirk bridgehead.

On May 26, a wholesale evacuation of these troops, dubbed “Operation Dynamo,” began. The evacuation was an amazing effort-the RAF kept the Luftwaffe at bay while thousands of ships, from military destroyers to small fishing boats, were used to ferry 338,000 French and British troops to safety, far more than anyone had thought possible. On June 4, Churchill spoke before the House of Commons, giving a report which celebrated the “miraculous deliverance” at Dunkirk, while also seeking to temper a too rosy of view of what was on the whole a “colossal military disaster.”

In Winston Churchill’s own words

“I have, myself, full confidence that if all do their duty, if nothing is neglected, and if the best arrangements are made, as they are being made, we shall prove ourselves once again able to defend our Island home, to ride out the storm of war, and to outlive the menace of tyranny, if necessary for years, if necessary alone. At any rate, that is what we are going to try to do. That is the resolve of His Majesty’s Government-every man of them. That is the will of Parliament and the nation. The British Empire and the French Republic, linked together in their cause and in their need, will defend to the death their native soil, aiding each other like good comrades to the utmost of their strength. Even though large tracts of Europe and many old and famous States have fallen or may fall into the grip of the Gestapo and all the odious apparatus of Nazi rule, we shall not flag or fail. We shall go on to the end, we shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our Island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, and even if, which I do not for a moment believe, this Island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God’s good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the old.”

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2008/08/01/the-35-greatest-speeches-in-history/

5 Best Ways to Recover from Stroke

5 Best Ways to Recover from Stroke

5 Best Ways to Recover from Stroke

If you’re trying to recover from stroke the best way possible, you’ve come to the right place. 

https://www.flintrehab.com/2017/best-way-to-recover-from-stroke/

If you’re worried that you don’t know enough about stroke recovery to understand your best options, then this post will catch you up to speed.

But, Please Understand This First…

Although this might not be what you want to hear, it’s important to know that there is no single “best way” to recover from stroke. (Hang with us for a sec.)

Every stroke is different and therefore every recovery will be different.

There is no single best way to recover from stroke since all stroke survivors will see the best results from different forms of therapy.

HOWEVER… 

There are still some “best practices” that can help boost your recovery when incorporated into whatever regimen works best for you.

Different stroke survivors can pursue different therapies and still achieve the best results possible as long as you’re incorporating all 5 “best practice” that we’re about to discuss.

Alright. Now that you know what this list is all about, let’s dig into our best stroke recovery practices.

1. Neuroplasticity – The King of Rehab

Before you even get started on any form of rehabilitation, it’s essential to understand what neuroplasticity because it’s how you will get the best results possible.

Neuroplasticity is the mechanism that your brain uses to rewire and heal itself after injury.

When part of the brain becomes damaged by stroke, the brain can actually rewire itself and train other parts of the brain to pick up the slack.

The better you can activate neuroplasticity, the better your recovery will be.

This element is sooo important.

Which begs the question, how can you activate your neuroplasticity?

2. Repetitive Practice

The best way to activate neuroplasticity is repetitive practice.

You will get the best results possible with forms of therapy that encourage you to perform a high number of reps.

Because each time you repeat something, you strengthen the new connections in your brain responsible for that task.

For example, hand therapy exercises are a great way to improve hand function after stroke.

And the BEST way to improve hand function is to practice those exercises over and over and over.

Each time you repeat a hand movement, the connections in your brain responsible for hand movement get stronger.

The more you practice, the better you get.

That’s why practice makes perfect.

3. A Consistent Regimen

We put consistency near the top of this list because it’s SUPER important for your best recovery.

Consistency helps the positive changes in your brain stick. The more consistent you are, the better your results will be.

Because each time you perform repetitive practice, you strengthen the new connections in your brain.

But if you don’t practice consistently, then the connections will begin to weaken. Your brain needs constant reinforcement while it’s healing.

4. Proper Feedback (Sounds Boring, but Super Important!)

Although feedback isn’t often considered one of the most important aspect of recovery – it is.

When you’re doing your rehab exercises, there needs to be clear success/failure cues to let your brain know that it’s doing something right or wrong.

Without this feedback, you will not see the best results.

You can learn more about what good feedback looks like here.

5. Mental Practice

Mental practice is the art of visualizing yourself doing something.

Mental practice can help you achieve your best recovery because it’s scientifically proven to help activate neuroplasticity the same way that physical practice does.

Mental practice works best when coupled with physical practice. So we recommend mentally practicing something right before physically practicing it.

For example, if you’re struggling to regain leg function and balance after stroke, then try visualizing yourself walking down the beach with perfect gait and balance.

This will help activate neuroplasticity in the areas of your brain responsible for log function and balance and help you get the best results from the physical practice you do next.

And, please, do us a favor and try not to skip this step!

Many stroke survivors disregard mental practice because it doesn’t seem substantial enough to make a big difference.

But trust us – mental practice is scientifically proven to make a huge difference when you complement it with physical practice.

The Best Way to Recover from Stroke

In summary, you will see the best results during stroke recovery if you follow this 5-step formula:

Your best recovery = neuroplasticity + repetition + consistency + feedback + mental practice

When you’re looking for new forms of therapy, make sure that it helps you activate neuroplasticity, perform a high number of reps, and experience good feedback.

Then, the consistency and mental practice is up to you.

TONIGHT SAM IS THE MAY MOMONDAY CHARITY

TONIGHT SAM IS THE MAY MOMONDAY CHARITY

SAM is the Momondays Charity for May 8, 2017 – Support SAM and Have a Great Evening of Entertainment, Laughter and a Really Great Time

How do you make a great momondays? Put story-telling into a blender, adding a dash of personal growth, and drop in a load of laughs… Then mix in live music & great conversation with some of the nicest people in the city (maybe on the planet!) then push the ‘high’ setting… and out comes momondays! https://www.momondays.com/winnipeg/

Momondays is a like a variety show bouncing off the walls of personal story-telling! Get ready for laughs and to be inspired and entertained!

MUSIC BY THE ECCO SINGERS!
Ecco Singers, no longer Winnipeg’s best kept secret, has been bringing music to the Manitoba scene since 1996. With members from a wide variety of backgrounds, this group has found a unique niche in the Winnipeg music community. We provide a regular concert season, in addition to special events ranging from a Big Band Dance to Rock Shows.

INSPIRATION FROM OUR SPEAKERS
• Ruth Bonneville – Being Single is Not a Sin; Ruth’s passion for life and creativity landed her a long-standing career as a photojournalist with the Winnipeg Free Press. Her love for photography was ignited by her father’s love for history and visual storytelling.

• Teri Hofford – On The Back Burner; Teri is an inspirational speaker, empowerment photographer and body image activist based in Winnipeg, Manitoba. She helps women to own their authenticity & stop the negative self talk, shifting their focus from changing their bodies, to changing the world.

• Roy Seidler – “Death Bed Mentality”; Roy is presently a co-owner of ROAR Leadership Consultants founded in 2008 with his partner in life, business and golf, Odette Labossiere. Previously he served for fourteen years as the Superintendent and CEO of the Seine River School Division. Roy continues to be very active in the field of public education conducting workshops on the topic of leadership.

• Rafiq Punjani – Hope and Hard Work; Rafiq is a successful entrepreneur, community worker, volunteer and family man.

• Terry Wilson – Never Accept Never; Terry is an entrepreneur and an advocate for the marginalized. Her roles in church and community have reflected her dedication to helping others. She loves to travel and has many stories from her escapades around the world. Oh yes, and Terry is a stroke survivor.

• Roy Seidler – Death Bed Mentality; Roy is presently a co-owner of ROAR Leadership Consultants founded in 2008 with his partner in life, business and golf, Odette Labossiere. Previously he served for fourteen years as the Superintendent and CEO of the Seine River School Division. Roy continues to be very active in the field of public education

The Canad Inns Aaltos offers a special buffet package for Momondays patrons

 

Our Next Big Event Is SAM’s 2017 Annual Wheel and Walk

The Annual SAM Wheel and Walk
Sunday, June 25th, 2017, 9:00 AM 

Grease up those wheels, dust off those runners, challenge your friends and get ready to “Wheel and Walk for SAM”!

This year’s Wheel & Walk for Stroke Recovery will
begin “Rain or Shine” 
with registration at Provencher Park


For a great start to the morning enjoy our SAM warm welcome with bagels and coffee while you catch up with friends and neighbors.

Browse the selection of knitwear and art and take a chance – enter the draws.

Stay for the BBQ Afterwards Following the Walk
Hot dogs, potato chips and soft drinks for lunch – all for just $5.00

Pledge sheets are available at the SAM Centre during office hours. 

Visiting Portage la Prairie Today

The PoThe Portage Group meets monthly.rtage Stroke Survivors Support Group meets today at 2 pm at the Herman Prior Centre in Portage la Prairie.

We at SAM are so pleased to accompany Board Member David Dowd to Portage la Prairie today to join their monthly meeting.

The Objectives of the Group are;

40 Royal Rd N, Portage la Prairie, MB R1N 1V1       (204) 857-6951
  1. To be a voice for stroke survivors and caregivers
  2. To create a sense of fraternity and fellowship within our group
  3. To maintain good relations with the Stroke Recovery Association of Manitoba
  4. To provide educational experiences for the group via speakers
  5. To educate the public in matters relating to strokes, recovery and care

Functions;

  • Putting shatter lives together
  • Improving the quality of life
  • Mental stimulation, self-help and socialization
  • Educating the public in matters relating to strokes

Result;

  • Support group members help to build moral
  • Survivors inspire others by their own achievements
  • Survivors respond to requests for help, when possible
  • A stroke changes your life, but help is available