How Does a Non-Profit Registered Charity Come Into Being?

How Does a Non-Profit Registered Charity Come Into Being?

In 1969…..Right There When It Happened

Annette Saltel* was right there when it happened. In fact, she was instrumental in the establishment of Stroke Recovery.

It all started in 1969 when she survived a stroke. Diagnosis, being what it was back then, found Annette confined to the St. Boniface Hospital psychiatric ward for three weeks.

When further diagnoses were complete, she was admitted into the Health Sciences Centre (HSC) while she underwent three months of speech therapy. She was the only female in the program.

During her stay at HSC, she met someone who would play a major part in her life: George Bonnett, another stroke survivor. Their common dilemma brought them together and they became fast friends.

And, as fate would have it, George’s roommate at HSC was Walter Karlicki.

A Stroke Club, If You Will

Annette, who was soon to be released from the hospital, suggested to Walter and George that it would be a heck of an idea if there was somewhere where stroke survivors could meet, share their experiences and help one another.

A Stroke Club, if you will…with peer support groups. And at this point in time, stroke was still widely misunderstood…even by doctors.

No one knew what to do with a stroke survivor, and as such, many of them ended up in psychiatric wards as Annette did. The three decided to team up and create a group of people who fully understood what a stroke survivor experiences.

They began to meet at George’s home, but before long, the club outgrew his basement. In 1973 they moved to the downtown YMCA, the same year the Stroke Club of Manitoba was incorporated.

The Founding Members were Annette Saltel, a housekeeper who became the first Secretary, Walter Karlicki, a law clerk who became the first President, George Bonnett, a salesman who became the first Vice President, and Willie Pohl, a manager who became the first Treasurer.

Another early member was a woman by the name of Mary Ann St. Germaine, who didn’t stay long, but in her brief stay with the Stroke Club, made a contribution that would change the face of the organization forever…a doodle. She was doodling on a piece of paper one day and, out of the blue, drew a little walking man who resembled a half paralyzed stroke survivor.

At the time the little guy was nameless, but not for long.

Meet SAM

The Manitoba Stroke Club worked out of the YMCA until 1984, when more growth forced it to move to Lombard Ave. In March of 1986, the club changed its name to the Stroke Association of Manitoba and the little walking guy finally had a name. SAM.

Then Recovery

Then in 1995, ‘Recovery’, arguably the most important word in the organization’s name, was added in order to clarify and emphasize the mission and objective of the corporation.

The name change took place on April 8, 1995 and since then we have been known as the Stroke Recovery Association of Manitoba. In 1992, SAM once again outgrew its home and moved to Vaughan Street.

And Now We Are Here

Then, time and more growth have forced SAM to its newest and most picturesque location at 247 Provencher Boulevard, in the heart of the historic French Quarter in St. Boniface, and still we are growing at a rapid rate with more programs than ever before and space is at a premium.

We’ve come a long way since 1969, and throughout the years, we have been blessed with many incredible leaders…some, sadly taken from us…but remembered always.

*The source of this material is from Annette Saltel – SAM co-founder.

 

WHAT STROKE RECOVERY PROGRAMS AND SERVICES DO PEOPLE WANT?

WHAT STROKE RECOVERY PROGRAMS AND SERVICES DO PEOPLE WANT?

The Stroke Recovery Association of Manitoba, Inc. is asking Manitobans to LET US KNOW!

*Has a Stroke Happened to You, Your Family, Your Friend - Your Input is Critical and Your Responses are Confidential  *Are You a Concerned Member of the Community  *Are You a Teacher Who's Student Requires Stroke Related Support  *Are You a Health Services Professional Concerned About What is Lacking and What is Most Needed  *Do you see services and program needs throughout the province that aren't being met.  *Are you a community organization wanting to collaborate to have a stronger, effective voice.  *Are you a Foundation wanting to have direct impact in a particular area of stroke recovery concern. 

SAM NEEDS TO HEAR FROM YOU – KINDLY PROVIDE YOUR INPUT BELOW!

Contact: Diane O’Neil, Executive Director, Stroke Recovery Association of Manitoba, Inc. at director [at] strokerecovery [dot] ca or phone at 204-942-2880 for information and/or questions about this very important issue.

“Crêpes judicieuses créées par Peter”

IF YOU MISSED GAMES DAY THURSDAY
YOU MISSED A GREAT GASTRONOMICAL EXPERIENCE

Peter created his signature
“Crêpes judicieuses créées par Peter”

Join us every Thursday from 11:00 am to 2:00 pm for games of strategy, cunning and skill, delicious treats, coffee and tea and conversation and friendship at SAM.

Everyone puts $1.00 in the pot & takes turns coming up with their own "GREAT GASTRONOMICAL EXPERIENCE". Our staff and volunteers prepare the refreshments and assist participants. 

  

Speaking Easy – In some of the famous words of Winston Churchill

 In some of the famous words of Winston Churchill 

“If you’re going through hell, keep going.”

“Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.”

“You have enemies? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.”  

“Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak. Courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.”

Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.”

“To improve is to change; to be perfect is to change often.”

“Never give in, never give in, never, never, never, never—in nothing, great or small, large or petty—never give in except to convictions of honor and good sense.” 

“A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.”

“History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.”

“We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.”

 Join us for Speakeasy
Today at 11 am
Stay for coffee and conversation

Speaking is Easy, join us every Friday from 11:00 am to 12:00 noon and discover how.

Did you know some of the most famous people experience difficulty speaking in public.

Speaking is Easy, join us every Friday from 11:00 am to 12:00 noon and discover why.

Winston Churchill, “We Shall Fight on the Beaches”
June 4, 1940; House of Commons, London

Winston Churchill, one of the greatest orators of the 20th century, was interestingly enough, like Demosthenes and other great orators before him, born with a speech impediment which he worked on until it no longer hindered him. One would never guess this from hearing Churchill’s strong and reassuring voice, a voice that would buoy up Britain during some of her darkest hours.

During the Battle of France, Allied Forces became cut off from troops south of the German penetration and perilously trapped at the Dunkirk bridgehead.

On May 26, a wholesale evacuation of these troops, dubbed “Operation Dynamo,” began. The evacuation was an amazing effort-the RAF kept the Luftwaffe at bay while thousands of ships, from military destroyers to small fishing boats, were used to ferry 338,000 French and British troops to safety, far more than anyone had thought possible. On June 4, Churchill spoke before the House of Commons, giving a report which celebrated the “miraculous deliverance” at Dunkirk, while also seeking to temper a too rosy of view of what was on the whole a “colossal military disaster.”

In Winston Churchill’s own words

“I have, myself, full confidence that if all do their duty, if nothing is neglected, and if the best arrangements are made, as they are being made, we shall prove ourselves once again able to defend our Island home, to ride out the storm of war, and to outlive the menace of tyranny, if necessary for years, if necessary alone. At any rate, that is what we are going to try to do. That is the resolve of His Majesty’s Government-every man of them. That is the will of Parliament and the nation. The British Empire and the French Republic, linked together in their cause and in their need, will defend to the death their native soil, aiding each other like good comrades to the utmost of their strength. Even though large tracts of Europe and many old and famous States have fallen or may fall into the grip of the Gestapo and all the odious apparatus of Nazi rule, we shall not flag or fail. We shall go on to the end, we shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our Island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender, and even if, which I do not for a moment believe, this Island or a large part of it were subjugated and starving, then our Empire beyond the seas, armed and guarded by the British Fleet, would carry on the struggle, until, in God’s good time, the New World, with all its power and might, steps forth to the rescue and the liberation of the old.”

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2008/08/01/the-35-greatest-speeches-in-history/